Leadership Pathways for Women Faculty: Strategies for Navigating Uncertain Times

The COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in significantly decreased productivity for many women scientists and clinicians compared to men and threatens to derail women from leadership pathways. Now, more than ever, women need to mindfully develop strategies to counter this trend and to continue to progress to leadership roles in the academic health sciences.

This program will include a panel discussion of senior women faculty leaders and facilitated peer mentoring sessions that will focus on discussing the challenges of academic leadership and advancement for women in general and in particular during the pandemic as well as developing strategies for advancement in various career paths.

Tuesday, December 8, 2020
4:30 p.m.

Sponsored by: the CUIMC Office of Faculty Professional Development, Diversity Inclusion, the Virginia Kneeland Frantz Society for Women Faculty, and the VP&S Office for Women and Diverse Faculty.

Moderators

  • Mary E. D’Alton, MD

    Willard C. Rappleye Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology; Chair, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology

    Mary E. D’Alton, MD is Obstetrician and Gynecologist-in-Chief and Chair at NewYork-Presbyterian/Columbia University Irving Medical Center. Specializing in Maternal Fetal Medicine, the majority of Dr. D'Alton's practice focuses on patients with high-risk pregnancies due to complex fetal or maternal conditions. At NYP/CUIMC, she has implemented a multidisciplinary, coordinated approach to manage the highest risk pregnancies at the Carmen and John Thain Center for Prenatal Pediatrics, which opened in 2011, and the Mothers Center, which opened in May 2018. As Chair of the Department of Ob/Gyn, Dr. D’Alton has worked to fill the gaps in women’s health, building and strengthening NYP/CUIMC’s programs in infertility, minimally invasive gynecologic surgery, gynecologic oncology, family planning, and integrated women’s health care. Her work to advance education, research, clinical practice, and policy in women’s health has won national recognition, including her election to the National Academy of Medicine in 2013. As co-chair of ACOG District II's Safe Motherhood Initiative since 2013, Dr. D’Alton has played a pivotal role in the effort to reduce maternal mortality and morbidity in New York State and nationally. Dr. D’Alton has served as president of the American Gynecological and Obstetrical Society (AGOS) and of the Society for Maternal Fetal Medicine (SMFM), which honored her with a Lifetime Achievement Award in 2006. The author or contributor to over 275 publications, Dr. D'Alton is co-editor of Seminars in Perinatology and has served on the editorial board of ACOG's Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  • Angela M. Mills, MD

    J.E. Beaumont Professor of Emergency Medicine at CUMC; Chair, Department of Emergency Medicine

    Angela M. Mills, MD is the J. E. Beaumont Professor and Chair of the Department of Emergency Medicine at Columbia University Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons as well as Chief of Emergency Services for NewYork-Presbyterian (NYP) – Columbia. A national leader and expert in emergency medicine, Dr. Mills graduated with Alpha Omega Alpha distinction from Temple University Medical School and completed the University of Pennsylvania Emergency Medicine residency program serving as Chief Resident. As a University of Pennsylvania faculty member, she advanced academically being promoted to Professor of Emergency Medicine in 2017 and served in several capacities including Medical Director and Vice Chair of Clinical Operations.

     

    In January 2018, Dr. Mills joined Columbia as the inaugural Chair of the newly formed Department of Emergency Medicine leading all academic and operational activities for the four emergency department sites: NYP-Columbia University Irving Medical Center, NYP-Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital, NYP-Allen Hospital, and NYP-Lawrence Hospital. As Chair, Dr. Mills has worked to successfully advance education, research, clinical care, and diversity and inclusion efforts while building a premier nationally recognized academic department of emergency medicine.

     

    For her accomplishments, Dr. Mills has been honored with a number of prestigious awards including the Arnold P. Gold Foundation Humanism in Medicine Award in 2017 from the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine, the Mid-Career Award from the Academy for Women in Academic Emergency Medicine, and the 2020 Chair of the Year Award from the Emergency Medicine Residents’ Association. Dr. Mills is an elected member of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine Board of Directors where she currently serves as Secretary-Treasurer. She has authored over 100 scientific publications, has received federal and industry research funding, and has influenced the careers of numerous faculty and trainees.

Panelists

  • Laureen L. Hill, MD, MBA

    Group Senior Vice President and Chief Operating Officer, NewYork- Presbyterian

    Laureen L. Hill, MD, MBA, is Group Senior Vice President & Chief Operating Officer for NewYork-Presbyterian/Columbia University Irving Medical Center. In this role, she manages and directs daily operations, including the cost, quality, and delivery of services for NYP/Columbia, and is also accountable for NYP/Allen Hospital and NYP/Lawrence Hospital. Dr. Hill joined NewYork-Presbyterian in 2017 after serving as Chair of the Department of Anesthesiology and Chief of Anesthesia Services at Emory University School of Medicine for over six years. Prior to joining Emory, she was Vice Chair of the Department of Anesthesiology at Washington University School of Medicine and a Professor of Anesthesiology and Cardiothoracic Surgery. A board certified anesthesiologist and intensivist, she received her medical degree from the University of California, Davis, and holds an M.B.A. from Washington University. She completed her residency in anesthesia at Stanford University, as well as fellowships in critical care medicine, adult cardiovascular anesthesia and pediatric anesthesia with a focus on congenital heart disease.

  • Hilda Y. Hutcherson, MD

    Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology at CUMC; Senior Associate Dean for Diversity and Multicultural Affairs

    Hilda Hutcherson, MD, MS, is the Senior Associate Dean in the Office of Diversity and Multicultural Affairs at Columbia Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons and a Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Columbia University Irving Medical Center. She is a graduate of Stanford University, Harvard Medical School and received her MS degree from Columbia University Institute of Human Nutrition. She completed her residency in Obstetrics and Gynecology at New York Presbyterian Hospital- Columbia. 

     

    As Senior Associate Dean, Dr. Hutcherson is charged with the recruitment and retention of a diverse student body and support of student affinity groups. She has received more than $10,000,000 in grants for pipeline programs that provide academic enrichment and mentoring for more than 400 underrepresented and disadvantaged middle school, high school and college students each year.  

     

    Dr. Hutcherson's clinical career has focused on the treatment of fibroid disease, female sexuality, and women's health. She has served on numerous task forces and advisory boards including the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, Doris Duke Clinical Research Fellowship, New York Presbyterian Hospital, Associated Medical Schools of New York, Planned Parenthood of New York City and the New York State Department of Health. The Governor of New York State twice appointed her to the New York State Stem Cell Board, and she is currently a member of the NIH Advisory Committee to the Director working group on Diversity. She received the VP&S Award for Excellence in Diversity, twice received the P&S Gender Equity Teaching Award, and was selected to the Academy of Community and Public Service. 

  • Emmanuelle Passegué, PhD

    Alumni Professor of Genetics and Development (in Rehabilitation and Regenerative Medicine); Director, Columbia Stem Cell Initiative

    Emmanuelle Passegué, PhD is the Alumni Professor of Genetics & Development and the Director of the Columbia Stem Cell Initiative (CSCI) at Columbia University Irving Medical Center (CUIMC) in New York City. Dr. Passegué received her PhD from the University Paris XI (France), and trained with Dr. Erwin Wagner (Institute for Molecular pathology, Vienna, Austria) and Dr. Irv Weissman (Stanford University, USA) before joining the University of California San Francisco (UCSF) in 2005. Dr. Passegué was a Professor of Medicine in the Hematology/Oncology Division and the Eli and Edythe Broad Center for Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research at UCSF until 2016 before joining CUIMC in January 2017. Her research investigates the biology of blood-forming hematopoietic stem cells in normal and deregulated contexts such as hematological malignancies and physiological aging. Dr. Passegué has received a number of awards and prizes including a Scholar Award from the Lymphoma and Leukemia Society, an Outstanding Investigator Award from the NHLBI, and the 2019 William Dameshek Prize from the American Society of Hematology.

  • Kathleen J. Sikkema, PhD

    Stephen Smith Professor of Sociomedical Sciences; Chair, Department of Sociomedical Sciences, Mailman School of Public Health

    Kathleen J. Sikkema, PhD, Stephen Smith Professor and Chair of Sociomedical Sciences in the Columbia Mailman School of Public Health, conducts community-based intervention research focused on HIV prevention and mental health treatment in the U.S. and in low- and middle- income countries. Previously, as the Gosnell Family Professor of Global Health, and Psychology and Neuroscience at Duke University, she served as the Director of Clinical Psychology and Founding Director of Social and Behavioral Sciences in the Center for AIDS Research (CFAR), the Global Mental Health Initiative and Doctoral Programs at the Duke Global Health Institute (DGHI). As a clinical psychologist who specializes in health and community psychology, Dr. Sikkema has led pioneering scholarship in global mental health, specifically related to traumatic stress, coping and gender violence. Funded by NIH for thirty years, her research program has focused on community-level HIV prevention trials, mental health interventions to improve HIV care engagement, and university-community research collaboration. U.S.-based HIV prevention interventions and mental health interventions developed by Dr. Sikkema and her teams have been identified by CDC and SAMHSA as best evidence interventions. Her research on HIV and mental health has had wide-ranging impact, including the development of prevention programs to improve health behaviors and access to treatment in low resource populations in this country and abroad. She has worked in South Africa for twenty years.  An honorary professor at the University of Cape Town in the Department of Psychiatry and Mental Health, Dr. Sikkema’s current research focuses on integrating mental health treatment into HIV primary care for women who have experienced sexual trauma. This research addresses the syndemic nature of HIV and mental disorders, whereby social and economic contextual factors create and exacerbate the risk of disease progression.

  • Wakenda K. Tyler, MD, MPH

    Associate Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at CUMC; Division Chief, Orthopaedic Oncology

    Wakenda Tyler, MD, MPH is currently an Associate Professor, Division Chief of Orthopaedic Oncology and Vice Chair of Diversity, Inclusion and Equity in the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery at Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC). She is also a member of the Herbert-Irving Cancer Center at CUMC.  Within the Columbia Medical system, she sits on several advisory committees to the Dean, including the Dean’s Advisory Committee on Diversity and the Dean’s Advisory Committee on Women in Health Care. At the national level, she is a member of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, The American Orthopaedic Association, The J. Robert Gladden Orthopaedic Society, The Ruth Jackson Orthopaedic Society, The Orthopaedic Research Society and currently sits as the Chair of the Education Committee for the Musculoskeletal Tumor Society. Her research has spanned several topics over her career including basic science work in metastatic bone disease as well as clinical research in equity in sarcoma care in under-served communities.

     

    Prior to joining the Columbia Medical Center team in 2017, Dr. Tyler initiated her career as an Attending Surgeon at the University of Rochester Medical Center, where she also rose to the rank of Associate Professor and Division Chief of Orthopaedic Oncology. She is most proud of her mentorship activities with young females coming from underserved communities in Rochester, NY.  She also has the distinct honor of receiving the Resident Teaching Award at both Columbia University and University of Rochester Medical Centers.

     

    Prior to her arrival in Rochester New York in 2009, she completed a fellowship in Orthopaedic Oncology at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center and Residency at Hospital for Special Surgery, both in New York City. She graduated with AOA designation from Johns Hopkins School of Medicine in Baltimore, Maryland.  She also obtained her Master’s in Public Health from the Johns Hopkins School of Public Health. 

     

    On a personal note, Dr. Tyler is married with one child and outside of work and spending time with her family, she is an avid runner, competing at the regional and national level for her age group.

Breakout peer mentoring groups facilitated by senior leaders from the Vagelos College of Physicians & Surgeons and the Mailman School of Public Health.

  • Clinical Leadership
  • Education Leadership
  • Hospital Leadership
  • Population-based Research Leadership
  • Research Leadership – Laboratory Science

Pathways to Administrative Leadership

  • H. Blair Simpson, MD

    Irving Philips Professor of Child Psychiatry at CUMC; Vice Chair of Research, Department of Psychiatry

    Helen Blair Simpson, MD, PhD, is the Vice Chair for Research and Professor of Psychiatry in the Department of Psychiatry at Columbia University. She is also the Director of Psychiatric Research, New York State Psychiatric Institute, the Director of the Research Area for Anxiety, Mood, Eating and Related Disorders and the Director of the Center for OCD and Related Disorders, New York State Psychiatric Institute. Funded by the National Institute of Mental Health since 1999, she uses clinical trials to identify the best treatments for anxiety and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), and partners with basic and clinical neuroscientists to elucidate how the brain produces anxiety, obsessions, and compulsions. Dr. Simpson is currently collaborating with OCD experts around the globe to identify brain signatures of OCD. She is also partnering with New York State to train front-line clinicians in the early detection and treatment of OCD. Advisor to the World Health Organization on the classification of OCD and author of the American Psychiatric Association’s Practice Guidelines for OCD, she works to transform care for people with anxiety and OCD.  

     

    Dr. Simpson graduated summa cum laude from Yale College, completed the MD-PhD program at The Rockefeller University/Cornell University Medical College, and trained as an intern and resident in psychiatry at Columbia University/New York-Presbyterian Hospital. She joined the Anxiety Disorders Clinic in 1996 and later served as its Director (2006-2016). In November 2016, she became the Vice Chair for Research in the Department of Psychiatry at Columbia University and Director of Research at the New York State Psychiatric Institute.

  • Joan M. Bathon, MD

    Professor of Medicine, Chief of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine; Faculty Advisory Dean for Clinician Scientist Faculty

    Joan M. Bathon, MD is a rheumatologist, Professor of Medicine, and Chief of the Division of Rheumatology at Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons.  Dr. Bathon’s career has focused on understanding the pathogenesis and functional consequences of inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis (RA).  Her group is particularly interested in understanding the effects of chronic rheumatoid inflammation on the extraarticular phenotype of RA, as manifested by accelerated atherosclerosis, myocardial dysfunction and adverse body composition.  Current work focuses on defining prevalence and risk factors associated with altered left ventricular structure and function in RA.  Additional work focuses on defining genetic, protein and cellular biomarkers to identify RA patients at highest risk for cardiovascular disease.  Her work has consistently been funded by NIH-NIAMS, the Rheumatology Research Foundation, and other sources. 

    Dr. Bathon has had an intense and consistent commitment to mentoring trainees and junior faculty throughout her career. Her mentees have spanned a number of disciplines including rheumatology, geriatrics, pulmonology, psychiatry, psychology, molecular medicine, and biomedical engineering. Most of the trainees have gone on to academic careers, many of them in investigative tracks. Her dedication to advancing the careers of women faculty and trainees is reflected by her past roles while at Johns Hopkins as Director of the Dean’s Office of Women in Science and Medicine, Co-Chair of the Women’s Leadership Council, and former Chair of the Department of Medicine’s Task Force on Academic Careers of Women in Medicine.  Since coming to Columbia University in 2010 as Chief of the Division of Rheumatology at Columbia, she has recruited a cadre of talented junior women faculty and revamped and expanded the fellowship training program to attract the most talented candidates.  She meets regularly with fellows and junior faculty to ensure that they are meeting milestones for successful careers.  As a previous Editor-in-Chief of a medical journal, she also coaches them on scientific writing skills.  As a member of her Departmental Promotions Committee and a recent member of Columbia’s University-wide Tenure Advisory Committee (and a Tenured Professor herself), she is well versed on milestones of a successful academic career. As a longstanding recipient of NIH funding, a member of multiple NIH study sections, and a current member of the NIAMS Advisory Council, she is also well versed in funding opportunities within the Institute and regularly update fellows and junior faculty of these opportunities.

Pathways to becoming a Chair

  • Lisa A. Kachnic, MD

    Chu H. Chang Professor of Radiation Oncology; Chair, Department of Radiation Oncology

    Lisa Kachnic, MD, FASTRO joined Columbia University Medical Center and the Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center in the fall of 2019 as Chair of the Radiation Oncology Department. She is the former Chairperson of the Department of Radiation Oncology at Vanderbilt University Medical Center. She received her undergraduate degree from Boston College and her medical degree from Tufts University. Dr. Kachnic completed her residency in Radiation Oncology at Harvard University, her last year as chief resident. Her primary areas of interest include rectal and anal malignancies, image-guided adaptive radiation delivery and outcomes/symptoms management research. Dr. Kachnic is actively involved in the National Cancer Institute’s (NCI) adult oncology research groups. At NRG Oncology, she serves as a senior member of their Gastrointestinal (GI) Strategic Committee, Associate PI of the NCI Community Oncology Research Program (NCORP), and Co-chair of the NCORP Cancer Control and Prevention Division. At SWOG, she is the Anorectal Committee Co-chairperson, Radiation Oncology Committee Vice Chair and the Multi-modality Executive Officer. Dr. Kachnic is also a long-standing member of the Rectal Anal NCI Taskforce. Importantly, her NCI clinical trials have changed the standard of care in several GI malignancies, most notably anal cancer. Dr. Kachnic has other national leadership positions that are worthy of mention. She is a fellow of the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) after many years of service, currently as the annual meeting Scientific Chair. She is also a former Trustee, Governor and President of the American Board of Radiology (ABR), 2010-2019. Dr. Kachnic has been the principle investigator on several government funded research efforts including a prior NCI Minority-based Community Clinical Oncology Program (CCOP) Award. 

  • Kathleen J. Sikkema, PhD

    Stephen Smith Professor of Sociomedical Sciences; Chair, Department of Sociomedical Sciences, Mailman School of Public Health

    Kathleen J. Sikkema, PhD, Stephen Smith Professor and Chair of Sociomedical Sciences in the Columbia Mailman School of Public Health, conducts community-based intervention research focused on HIV prevention and mental health treatment in the U.S. and in low- and middle- income countries. Previously, as the Gosnell Family Professor of Global Health, and Psychology and Neuroscience at Duke University, she served as the Director of Clinical Psychology and Founding Director of Social and Behavioral Sciences in the Center for AIDS Research (CFAR), the Global Mental Health Initiative and Doctoral Programs at the Duke Global Health Institute (DGHI). As a clinical psychologist who specializes in health and community psychology, Dr. Sikkema has led pioneering scholarship in global mental health, specifically related to traumatic stress, coping and gender violence. Funded by NIH for thirty years, her research program has focused on community-level HIV prevention trials, mental health interventions to improve HIV care engagement, and university-community research collaboration. U.S.-based HIV prevention interventions and mental health interventions developed by Dr. Sikkema and her teams have been identified by CDC and SAMHSA as best evidence interventions. Her research on HIV and mental health has had wide-ranging impact, including the development of prevention programs to improve health behaviors and access to treatment in low resource populations in this country and abroad. She has worked in South Africa for twenty years.  An honorary professor at the University of Cape Town in the Department of Psychiatry and Mental Health, Dr. Sikkema’s current research focuses on integrating mental health treatment into HIV primary care for women who have experienced sexual trauma. This research addresses the syndemic nature of HIV and mental disorders, whereby social and economic contextual factors create and exacerbate the risk of disease progression.

Pathways to Clinical Leadership

  • Mary E. D’Alton, MD

    Willard C. Rappleye Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology; Chair, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology

    Mary E. D’Alton, MD is Obstetrician and Gynecologist-in-Chief and Chair at NewYork-Presbyterian/Columbia University Irving Medical Center. Specializing in Maternal Fetal Medicine, the majority of Dr. D'Alton's practice focuses on patients with high-risk pregnancies due to complex fetal or maternal conditions. At NYP/CUIMC, she has implemented a multidisciplinary, coordinated approach to manage the highest risk pregnancies at the Carmen and John Thain Center for Prenatal Pediatrics, which opened in 2011, and the Mothers Center, which opened in May 2018. As Chair of the Department of Ob/Gyn, Dr. D’Alton has worked to fill the gaps in women’s health, building and strengthening NYP/CUIMC’s programs in infertility, minimally invasive gynecologic surgery, gynecologic oncology, family planning, and integrated women’s health care. Her work to advance education, research, clinical practice, and policy in women’s health has won national recognition, including her election to the National Academy of Medicine in 2013. As co-chair of ACOG District II's Safe Motherhood Initiative since 2013, Dr. D’Alton has played a pivotal role in the effort to reduce maternal mortality and morbidity in New York State and nationally. Dr. D’Alton has served as president of the American Gynecological and Obstetrical Society (AGOS) and of the Society for Maternal Fetal Medicine (SMFM), which honored her with a Lifetime Achievement Award in 2006. The author or contributor to over 275 publications, Dr. D'Alton is co-editor of Seminars in Perinatology and has served on the editorial board of ACOG's Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  • Laura Lennihan, MD

    Professor of Neurology at CUMC; Vice Chair, Department of Neurology; Chief of Critical Care and Hospitalist Neurology, Department of Neurology; Faculty Advisory Dean for Clinician Educator Faculty

    Laura Lennihan, MD is Vice Chair of the Department of Neurology, Chief of the Division of Critical Care and Hospitalist Neurology, and Professor of Neurology at Columbia University Irving Medical Center (CUIMC). A specialist in the neurological care of inpatient populations, Dr. Lennihan oversees the Neurology Consult and Neurohospitalist Services at the NewYork-Presbyterian (NYP) Milstein Hospital, where she is an Attending Physician. She also oversees Neurohospitalist Services at the NYP Allen and Lawrence Hospitals.

    Dr. Lennihan received her undergraduate degree from Harvard University and her medical doctorate from Cornell University Medical College. After completing residency in internal medicine at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Dr. Lennihan came to Columbia-Presbyterian Hospital for residency at the Neurological Institute of New York. She remained at Columbia for fellowship training in both Cerebrovascular Diseases and Neuroepidemiology, and subsequently joined the faculty of the Department of Neurology at the Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons in 1987. She has served in various clinical, administrative, and leadership capacities at NYP/CUIMC in the time since, while also serving as an Attending Physician (1989-2014), Director of Stroke Rehabilitation (1989-2006), and Chief of Neurology (1994-2006) at Helen Hayes Hospital in New York.

    Dr. Lennihan is a current and longstanding member of the CUIMC Ethics Committee. She has been a member of the Alpha Omega Alpha Society since 1977 and the American Academy of Neurology (AAN) since 1982, in which she received the formal distinction of Fellow (FAAN) in 1996. Dr. Lennihan has received numerous honors and awards, including the NewYork-Presbyterian Physician of the Year Award (2007), the Stephen Q. Shafer Award for Humanism in Neurology (2009), and the Lewis P. Rowland Teacher of the Year Award (2014).

    A longtime advocate for women in academic medicine, Dr. Lennihan sits on multiple university and departmental advisory committees overseeing the recruitment, retention, appointment, and promotion of a diverse faculty. As Vice Chair of the Department of Neurology since 2011, she has worked to cultivate mentoring networks between junior and senior women faculty, including fostering broad participation in the Women of Neurology Seminar Series and the Women Physicians Initiative of NewYork-Presbyterian. Through her unwavering commitment to the creation of academic opportunities for women, Dr. Lennihan has helped steer the growth of the Columbia University Department of Neurology, which is currently ranked #1 in NIH-funded research, and is widely considered a leader in the field in terms of women faculty at each academic rank among neurology programs nationwide.

    With her recent appointment as Advisory Dean for Clinician-Educator Faculty for the Office for Women and Diverse Faculty, she looks forward to continuing to provide mentorship and faculty development guidance to VP&S women and minority faculty.

Pathways to Education Leadership

  • Rita Charon, MD, PhD

    Professor of Medical Humanities and Ethics and of Medicine at CUMC; Chair, Department of Medical Humanities and Ethics

    Rita Charon, MD, PhD is a general internist and literary scholar. She is Professor and Chair of the Department of Medical Humanities and Ethics, Professor of Medicine, and Executive Director of Columbia Narrative Medicine.

  • Rini Ratan, MD

    Professor of Obstetrics & Gynecology at CUMC; Vice Chair for Education, Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology; Advisory Dean for Clinician Educator Faculty

    Rini Banerjee Ratan, MD is Vice Chair of Education and the Berkowitz Family Associate Professor of Women’s Health in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Columbia University Irving Medical Center.  She is currently the Residency Program Director and Chair of the Graduate Medical Education Committee of New York Presbyterian Hospital’s Columbia Campus.  She also served as medical student Clerkship Director for eleven years.  After earning her undergraduate degree at Yale University, she attended Harvard Medical School and completed her residency training at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Massachusetts General Hospital.  Her academic interests include developing innovative methods to enhance the quality of medical education.  Dr. Ratan has received the Charles W. Bohmfalk Award for Excellence in Clinical Teaching at Columbia University College of Physicians & Surgeons, the APGO Excellence in Teaching Award, and the AMWA Outstanding Female Physician Award.  Dr. Ratan is a Fellow of the Virginia Apgar Academy of Medical Educators at CUMC.  She has served on numerous committees at the NBME, including Chair of the USMLE Women’s Health Task Force, and currently sits on the Board of the NBME.  She also serves as an oral board examiner for the American Board of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

    Dr. Ratan is deeply committed to ensuring that women and diverse faculty are included in leadership positions and scholarly advancement, and are appropriately represented in institutional honors and awards at VP&S.  Dr. Ratan became an obstetrician-gynecologist because of a passion for women’s health, and she is equally dedicated to assuring that women faculty have an equal presence in our medical school, and our larger community.

Pathways to Hospital Leadership

  • Deepa Kumaraiah, MD, MBA

    Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine; Senior Vice President, Service Lines and Chief Physician, NewYork- Presbyterian Medical Groups

    Deepa Kumaraiah, MD, MBA, is Senior Vice President of Service Lines and Chief Physician, NewYork-Presbyterian Medical Groups, as well as an Assistant Professor of Medicine and practicing cardiac intensivist at Columbia University Irving Medical Center. Dr. Kumaraiah provides leadership and strategic vision for the clinical service lines across the NewYork-Presbyterian enterprise. She leads efforts to drive clinical transformation through standardization, regionalization, and virtualization while ensuring one single standard of care across NewYork-Presbyterian’s 10-campuses and over 140 clinics throughout Brooklyn, Queens and Westchester.

     

    During her time at NYP, she has worked on population health initiatives including DSRIP and NewYork Quality Care ACO and served as an advisor and investment committee member of NYP Ventures.   She has also worked as a healthcare consultant for McKinsey and Company. Dr. Kumaraiah has received numerous awards and honors, including being named Physician of the Year by NewYork-Presbyterian and a Fellow of the New York Academy of Medicine.

     

    Dr. Kumaraiah graduated with a ScB from Brown University and an MBA from the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School. She received her MD from the University of Pennsylvania.  Dr. Kumaraiah completed her internal medicine residency at Massachusetts General Hospital and her cardiovascular fellowship at Columbia University Irving Medical Center.

  • Julia E. Iyasere, MD, MBA

    Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine; Vice President, Dalio Center for Health Justice; Associate Chief Medical Officer, Service Lines; NewYork- Presbyterian|Columbia University Irving Medical Center

    Julia Iyasere, MD, is the Executive Director of the Dalio Center for Health Justice at NewYork-Presbyterian. In this role, she leads the Center’s efforts to address longstanding health disparities due to race, socio-economic differences, limited access to care, and other complex factors that impact the wellbeing of our communities disproportionately. Established in 2020, the Center for Health Justice works collaboratively with representatives from NYP, Weill Cornell Medicine, and Columbia Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons to be a leader in the understanding and improving of health equity, and to drive action that results in measurable improvements in health outcomes for all.

    A native of Southern California, Dr. Iyasere moved to the East Coast to attend Yale University where she graduated with a B.S. in Molecular Biology with a focus in Neuroscience. After a year working in cancer cell biology and cell signaling cascades at Harvard Medical School, she joined the Columbia community at Columbia Vagelos College of Physician and Surgeons (VP&S), eventually choosing to pursue a dual degree with Columbia Business School and graduating with an MD/MBA in 2008. After completing her residency in Internal Medicine at Columbia, Dr. Iyasere stayed for a year as Chief Resident before joining the Division of General Medicine at Columbia in 2012. She completed a part-time fellowship in Medical Simulation at the Mary and Michael Jaharis Simulation Center at VP&S during her first year with the Division.

    Dr. Iyasere brings more than a decade of experience in medicine to her new role. She was previously the Associate Chief Medical Officer for Service Lines and the Co-Director of the Care Team Office. She was also Director of the Leadership Education and Development for Physicians (LEAD) Academy, Associate Designated Institutional Official for Graduate Medical Education at NYPH, and the Associate Program Director of the Columbia Internal Medicine Residency Training Program. An Assistant Professor of Medicine at Columbia University Irving Medical Center, Dr. Iyasere continues to see patients as an internist in the Section for Hospital Medicine.

Pathways to Population-based Research

  • Terry McGovern, JD

    Harriet and Robert Heilbrunn Professor of Population and Family Health at CUMC; Chair, Heilbrunn Department of Population and Family Health, Mailman School of Public Health

    Terry McGovern currently serves as Harriet and Robert H. Heilbrunn Professor and Chair of the Heilbrunn Department of Population and Family Health and the Director of the Program on Global Health Justice and Governance at the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health. Ms. McGovern founded the HIV Law Project in 1989 where she served as its executive director until 1999. Ms. McGovern successfully litigated numerous cases against the federal, state and local governments including S.P. v. Sullivan, which forced the Social Security Administration to expand HIV-related disability criteria for women and other excluded individuals, and T.N. v. FDA, which eliminated a 1977 FDA guideline restricting the participation of women of childbearing potential in early phases of clinical trials. As a member of the National Task Force on the Development of HIV/AIDS Drugs, she authored the 2001 federal regulation authorizing the FDA to halt any clinical trial for a life threatening disease that excludes women. From 2006 until 2012, she was Senior Program Officer in the Gender, Rights and Equality Unit of the Ford Foundation. Her research focuses on health and human rights, sexual and reproductive rights and health, gender justice, and environmental justice, with publications appearing in journals including Lancet Child & Adolescent Health, Health and Human Rights, and the Journal of Adolescent Health. Ms. McGovern recently co-edited Women and Girls Rising: Rights, Progress and Resistance: A Global Anthology. She has served on the Standing Lancet Commission on Adolescent Health and Wellbeing and the UCL-Lancet Commission on Migration and Health, and currently serves as a member of the UNFPA Global Advisory Council and the UNAIDS Human Rights Reference Group.

  • Melissa Stockwell, MD, MPH

    Associate Professor of Pediatrics and Population and Family Health; Chief, Division of Child and Adolescent Health, Department of Pediatrics

    Melissa Stockwell, MD, MPH is the Chief of the Division of Child and Adolescent Health and a tenured Associate Professor of Pediatrics and Population and Family Health in the Department of Pediatrics at Columbia University’s College of Physicians and Surgeons and the Department of Population and Family Health at the Mailman School of Public Health. She is also the founding director of the Department of Pediatrics’ Center for Children’s Digital Health Research. She is Medical Director of the NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital Immunization Registry (EzVac) and Co-Director of the Columbia University Primary Care Clinician Research Fellowship in Community Health. Additionally, she is a pediatrician in a NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital-associated community clinic, and is Associate Director of the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) Pediatric Research in Office Settings (PROS) practice-based research network. 

    Dr. Stockwell’s research program, which concentrates on underserved children and adolescents, focuses on translational interventions to improve vaccinations, with an emphasis on health technology and health literacy. Throughout her career, she has had continuous research support from the National Institutes of Health (NIH), Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and Health Resources and Service Administration (HRSA). She has been inducted into the American Pediatric Society, the oldest academic pediatric organization in North America.

Pathways to Research Leadership – Laboratory Science

  • Angela M. Christiano, PhD

    Richard and Mildred Rhodebeck Professor of Dermatology and Professor of Genetics and Development; Vice Chair for Research, Department of Dermatology; Faculty Advisory Dean for Basic Scientist Faculty

    Angela M. Christiano, PhD, is the Richard and Mildred Rhodebeck Professor of Dermatology and Professor of Genetics and Development at Columbia University Medical Center. She is also the Vice Chair of Research in the Department of Dermatology at CUMC. For the past 20 years, Dr. Christiano's research has focused on understanding the molecular processes that lead to inherited skin and hair disorders in humans. Her research career began with the discovery of genetic mutations associated with epidermolysis bullosa, a skin disease that causes severe blistering. Dr. Christiano’s recent work has focused on the investigation of the underlying genetic causes of and identification of potential therapies for alopecia areata, an autoimmune form of hair loss.  She has published more than 350 papers in peer-reviewed journals and has trained more than 50 postdoctoral researchers and clinical fellows at Columbia University. Dr. Christiano has received numerous awards, including the New York City Mayor’s Award for Excellence in Science and Technology – Young Investigator’s Award, Columbia University’s Harold and Golden Lamport Research Award for Excellence in Clinical Sciences, the CERIES Research Award, and the North American Hair Research Society’s award for Outstanding Paper of the Year, the Montagna Award from the Society for Investigative Dermatology, and the Ebling Award from the European Hair Research Society. Dr. Christiano is a Past President of the Society for Investigative Dermatology, and served as Deputy Editor of the Journal of Investigative Dermatology for ten years.  Dr. Christiano is a prolific inventor and serial entrepreneur, having filed numerous patents on her discoveries, and successfully moved technologies from the academic setting into the commercial sector.  She earned her MS and PhD degrees in Microbiology and Molecular Genetics from Rutgers University. In 2020, Dr. Christiano was elected to the National Academy of Science.

  • Laura Landweber, PhD

    Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics and of Biological Sciences (in Systems Biology); Vice Chair of Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics

    Laura Landweber, PhD is a Professor in the Departments of Biochemistry & Molecular Biophysics, Biological Sciences, and Systems Biology, in the Colleges of Physicians & Surgeons and Arts & Sciences. Prior to moving her lab to Columbia University Medical Center she was faculty at Princeton University from 1994-2016, and a Junior Fellow of the Society of Fellows at Harvard University, where she received her PhD in 1993. She has authored over 150 publications in molecular and evolutionary biology and edited 3 books, in areas ranging from genetics and evolution to biological computation. She is President (2017) of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution (SMBE) and has served on several panels, working groups, and advisory committees for the NSF, NIH, and NASA, including co-chairing the NHGRI Comparative Genome Evolution Working Group from 2003-2007. Recent awards include a Guggenheim fellowship (2012) and a Blavatnik award for young scientists (2008), and she was elected a Fellow of AAAS for probing the diversity of genetic systems in microbial eukaryotes, including scrambled genes, RNA editing, variant genetic codes, and comparative genomics. Her work investigates the origin of novel genetic systems and complex genome architectures, using the ciliate Oxytricha as a model. Recent discoveries include the ability of small and long non-coding RNA molecules to program genome organization across generations, bypassing the information encoded in DNA.